Is deep cleaning worth it dental?

If your visit to the dentist reveals significant pockets (4 mm or larger), then you are at risk of suffering from (or being in stages of) periodontal disease. This makes you a candidate for therapy (a thorough dental cleaning) and is highly recommended if you want to stop and prevent the progression of the disease.

Is deep cleaning worth it dental?

If your visit to the dentist reveals significant pockets (4 mm or larger), then you are at risk of suffering from (or being in stages of) periodontal disease. This makes you a candidate for therapy (a thorough dental cleaning) and is highly recommended if you want to stop and prevent the progression of the disease. A thorough dental cleaning can eliminate plaque and tartar buildup on the teeth, reducing gum inflammation and improving gum health. A deep dental cleaning is necessary when there is a significant amount of bacteria and tartar accumulation on the surface of the teeth.

Once pockets form due to gum disease, bacteria and tartar begin to fill them. If it is not removed, periodontal disease and, eventually, tooth loss can occur. Deep cleaning is not necessary for all patients. However, for patients with gingivitis (the first stage of gum disease) or a more serious case of gum disease, deep cleaning may be necessary to prevent tooth loss and prevent further damage.

The main purpose of regular dental cleanings is to remove plaque and calculus that build up around and slightly below the gum line. If your dentist and hygienist determine that your teeth and gums are healthy, they will likely recommend normal cleaning, no matter how much time has passed since your last cleaning. So what else does deep cleaning entail than the difference from regular cleaning? Is it worth talking to the dentist about deep cleaning your teeth? Let's discuss the pros and cons to get a better idea of the advantages and disadvantages of each one. In general, the goal of regular cleaning is preventive maintenance and the goal of deep dental cleaning is to stop the progression of gum disease.

When a dental professional refers to deep teeth cleaning, they often work with patients who have problems with gum disease. If bacteria invade below the gum line, you'll need a thorough dental cleaning to restore gum health. While many believe that regular dental cleanings and deep cleanings are the same thing, there are some significant differences between the two treatments. If the bags are deeper than can be treated with standard cleaning and good home care, you'll need a deep cleaning to eliminate the infection and promote healing.